Philip Copeman

Author and Activist

Philip Copeman

Marc Beckenstrater

The Rollerball Economy is a dystopian description of the world economy in the early twenty first century, influenced by the Norman Jewison film Rollerball (1975). Dystopian scenarios are usually restricted to Science fiction, but as we approach 2018 (The setting year of the Rollerball Film) there are ominous signs that the real world is plunging inexorably into the dark scenario of The Rollerball Economy.

The Rollerball Economy is characterised by:

Skewing of income patterns in favor of a few winners;

Conglomeration of global corporations;

Concentration of production in Capital intensive industries;

Rising debt levels and debt instruments;

Emasculation of democratic institutions;

Excessively high interest rates for rent seekers;

High levels of global tax avoidance;

Advance of global media empires;

Subjugation of individual entrepreneurialism;

Jobs are few and the wages are minimally above subsistence handouts.

We are all waiting for Jonathan E to liberate us...

Welcome to the Rollerball Economy

Reference

Wikipedia – Dystopia

Wikipedia – Rollerball Film (1975)

Keynes, John Maynard, The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money 1935

This is a must starting point for any economist wishing to defend the capitalist or socialist system of mixed Government. It is also important for free market economists, libertarians and sociologists as this wall in the philosophy of economics may trap you on a side that you do not anticipate.

Keynes, John Maynard, The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money 1935

This is a must starting point for any economist wishing to defend the capitalist or socialist system of mixed Government. It is also important for free market economists, libertarians and sociologists as this wall in the philosophy of economics may trap you on a side that you do not anticipate.

Subukwe, Magaliso Robert, Speeches on formation and opening of the Pan Africanist Congress of Azania 1959

Starting point for all Capitalists if they want to understand Democratic African Socialism. Subuwe is a very important voice for dealing with the Maxist incursions on inequality and other lapses in reason.

Henry Hazlitt, The Critics of Keynesian Economics (PDF) 1960,

Collection of Essays that espouse the Classical System and its argument against Keynesianism. Important lest in your exuberance you advance a hypothesis already proposed by some defunct economist.

Wassily Wassilyovich Leontief Input-Output Economics 1966

If you don't get the Linear Model how do you calculate or compare anything? We must have a common reference point on which to measure econimic progress, other wise all discussion become ever more verbous debates.

Luigi L. Pasinetti Growth and Income Distribution , 1974,

Establishes a non linear model for Ricardian Analysis and gives us a non linear development framework.

Paul Samuelson Economics 1981 McGraw-Hill 1976

If you don't read this then you simply are not on the same page as 99% of the English Speaking Economists in the world. Without a knowledge of Samuelson, terminology will be a deterent rather than an expletive.

Philip Copeman, Forecasting inflation with input output analysis, 1981

As a reminder that prices are not constant.

Joseph Stiglitz, The Roaring Nineties, 2003

Nobel Laureate Stiglitz explains that our current depression is a counter cyclical response to an period of exuberance and over expansion.

Mathew Sinclair, How to Cut Public Spending and Still win an election 2010

The Conservative approach still belevieves that the root of all evil is large Government and a return to small Government and Release of resources to private hands will ease inequality.

Paul Krugman, End this Depression Now 2012

Nobel Laureate Krugman is the the Archbishop if NeoKeynesianism here is outlines a plan to use classic Keynesian techniques to solve a mirror of the 1930s.

Joseph Stiglitz, The Price of Equality, 2013

Stripped bare, and without solutions, Stiglitz fall back on socialist solutions to our current predicament. This book is important because it does present enough hard data to show the extent of our global problem and is a warning to anyone that may wish to dismiss events as a glitch that can be easily corrected.

Henry Hazlitt, The Critics of Keynesian Economics (PDF) 1960,

Collection of Essays that espouse the Classical System and its argument against Keynesianism. Important lest in your exuberance you advance a hypothesis already proposed by some defunct economist.

Wassily Wassilyovich Leontief Input-Output Economics 1966

If you don't get the Linear Model how do you calculate or compare anything? We must have a common reference point on which to measure economic progress, other wise all discussions become ever more verbous debates.

Luigi L. Pasinetti Growth and Income Distribution , 1974,

Establishes a non linear model for Ricardian Analysis and gives us a non linear development framework.

Paul Samuelson Economics 1981 McGraw-Hill 1976

If you don't read this then you simply are not on the same page as 99% of the English Speaking Economists in the world. Without a knowledge of Samuelson, terminology will be a deterrent rather than an expletive.

Philip Copeman, Forecasting inflation with input output analysis, 1981

As a reminder that prices are not constant.

Joseph Stiglitz, The Roaring Nineties, 2003

Nobel Laureate Stiglitz explains that our current depression is a counter cyclical response to an period of exuberance and over expansion.

Mathew Sinclair, How to Cut Public Spending and Still win an election 2010

The Conservative approach still belevieves that the root of all evil is large Government and a return to small Government and Release of resources to private hands will ease inequality.

Paul Krugman, End this Depression Now 2012

Nobel Laureate Krugman is the the Archbishop if NeoKeynesianism. Here he outlines a plan to use classic Keynesian techniques to solve a mirror problem of the 1930s.

Joseph Stiglitz, The Price of Equality, 2013

Stripped bare, and without solutions, Stiglitz fall back on socialist solutions to our current predicament. This book is importnat because it does present enough hard data to show the extent of our global problem and is a warning to anyone that may wish to dismiss events as a glitch that can be easily corrected.

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Comment by Philip Copeman on July 25, 2013 at 10:31am

Compare how rich a country is vs how much its wealth is shared

Comment by Philip Copeman on August 14, 2016 at 12:39pm

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